10 Unknown Google Tips

31653ckv7e9sfy7[1] Someone sent me the following list of neat Google tricks.  I wish I could give credit to the writer, so forgive me about that. If anyone knows, let me know. However, here are new ways to use Google that we all can use:

1.         Definitions
Pull up the definition of the word by typing define followed by the word you want the definition for. For example, typing: define bravura would display the definition of that word.

2.         Local search
Visit Google Local enter the area you want to search and the keyword of the place you want to find. For example, typing: restaurant at the above link would display local restaurants.

3.         Phone number lookup
Enter a full phone number with area code to display the name and address associated with that phone number.

4.         Find weather and movies
Type "weather" or "movies" followed by a zip code or city and state to display current weather conditions or movie theaters in your area. For example, typing weather 84101 gives you the current weather conditions for Salt Lake City, UT and the next four days. Typing movies 84101 would give you a link for show times for movies in that area.

5.         Track airline flight
Enter the airline and flight number to display the status of an airline flight and it's arrival time. For example, type: delta 123 to display this flight information if available.

6.         Track packages
Enter a UPS, FedEx or USPS tracking number to get a direct link to track your packages.

7.          Pages linked to you
See what other web pages are linking to your website or blog by typing link: followed by your URL. For example, typing link:http://www.computerhope.com displays all pages linking to Computer Hope.

8.         Find PDF results only
Add filetype: to your search to display results that only match a certain file type. For example, if you wanted to display PDF results only type: "dell xps" filetype:pdf -- this is a great way to find online manuals.

9.         Calculator
Use the Google Search engine as a calculator by typing a math problem in the search. For example, typing: 100 + 200 would display results as 300.

10.        Stocks
Quickly get to a stock quote price, chart, and related links by typing the stock symbol in Google. For example, typing: msft will display the stock information for Microsoft.

 


"10 dumb things users do that can mess up their computers"

Check out these very helpful reminders from the information technology gurus at TechRepublic:

"We all do dumb things now and then, and computer users are no exception. Inadvertently pressing the wrong key combination or innocently clicking OK in the wrong dialog box can change important settings that alter a computer's behavior or even crash the system.

"Nervous newbies are often fearful that one wrong move might break the computer forever. Luckily, short of taking a sledge hammer to the box, the consequences aren't usually quite that dire. Even so, users often do create problems for their computers and for your network. Here's a description of common missteps you can share with your users to help them steer clear of preventable problems.

#1: Plug into the wall without surge protection

"Here's one that actually can physically destroy your computer equipment, as well as the data it holds. You may think your systems are in danger only during an electrical storm, but anything that interrupts the electrical circuit and then starts the current back again can fry your components. Something as simple as someone turning on an appliance that's plugged into the same circuit (especially a high voltage one such as a hair dryer, electric heater, or air conditioner) can cause a surge, or a surge may be caused by a tree limb touching a power line. If you have a power outage, you may experience a surge when the electricity comes back on.

[snip]

#6: Open all attachments

"Some folks just can't help themselves: Getting an e-mail message with an attachment is like getting an unexpected gift. You just have to peek inside to see what it is. But just as that package left on your doorstep could contain a bomb, that file attached to your mail message could contain code that will delete your documents or system folder or send viruses to everyone in your address book."


"Beware the Hidden Costs of Bad Formatting"

Pretty poor reaction to need for increased training given that documents produced by law firms are so important!

"When talking to law firms about training, I often hear the following statements: 'It's so easy, you don't need training'; 'If you can't learn it in an hour, it's not worth knowing'; and my favorite, 'We're getting documents out the door.'

"Law firms often use arguments like those mentioned above to skimp on training. However, there can be real bottom-line consequences to this kind of thinking. Training your users on proper document formatting can mean the difference between a document that will cost your firm unnecessary time, money and productivity and one that won't. For example, you can compare two visually identical 30-page Word documents side by side. They may look exactly the same, but one could require 2 1/2 minutes to make three basic changes while the other takes more than 60 minutes. What makes the difference? Formatting!

"Document formatting is not a sexy topic, but if you run the dollars on how much money it saves, you quickly realize how important a consideration it really is. A document that is poorly formatted [PDF] behind the scenes is full of tabs, hard returns and manual numbering. With these documents, every time text is added or deleted, someone must go into the text and remove tabs, adjust hard returns and page breaks and manually renumber the paragraphs. All formatting is direct formatting so that if the point size for 50 paragraphs needs to be changed, all 50 paragraphs must be formatted."

Good examples of formatting problems are included in the complete article.

Author Roberta Gelb, a member of the Law Technology News Editorial Advisory Board, is also president of Chelsea Office Systems Inc., based in New York.


"Can Data Have a Life After a Death?"

Of course! Just be sure to utilize some basic, but smart, computer management skills:

"Everyone who has worked with a computer, even before the arrival of the Internet, knows the sickening feeling of loss. Without warning, hours of your work suddenly vanish from the screen. You hope (and pray) that perhaps it's been saved in a backup or temp file -- but often it's not. As your internal soundtrack turns up the volume on Don Henley and Glenn Frey, you realize that your carefully crafted project is 'already gone' -- and that it's not the time for a victory song. Instead, you will have to painstakingly recreate the work you had already done -- but didn't get a chance to (or even forgot to) save before the crash signaled by the apparently ubiquitous 'blue screen of death.'

"Fortunately, this problem is an easy one to fix -- before the fact. Periodic automatic save features can be turned on in many programs, such as Word, and 'Control S' has become an automatic part of typing for many people. On a systemwide basis, network administrators can generate minute-by-minute backups -- many thanks to David, Steve and the Help Desk at my firm, because their efforts have often saved me during computer or system crashes and blackouts."

Author Stanley P. Jaskiewicz, a business lawyer at the Philadelphia law firm of Spector Gadon & Rosen P.C., helps clients solve e-commerce, corporate contract and technology-law problems, and is a member of e-Commerce Law & Strategy's Board of Editors. Jaskiewicz thanks his legal assistant, Frank Manzano, for his research support for this article.


"Gadgets Put the Holiday Spirit in Your PC"

Yay, more presents for me! Well, not me exactly:

"With the holiday season in full swing, it's time to consider some gifts for your computer. Nothing tells your PC that you care about its happiness more than a few high-tech gadgets to make its life a little more exciting. Of course, if those gadgets also help you out as well, then everyone's happy.

"The first item you might consider is Microsoft's new operating system, Windows Vista. Vista contains many new features, is more stable and secure than its predecessors, XP or Windows 2000. However, be prepared to upgrade various components on your machine."


Some Holiday Fun...

Have you ever wanted to make a pc-o-lantern? Or a mac-o-lantern? Sure you have!

"Look at this. We've [University of Arkansas Dept. of Computing Services/Help Desk] made a pumpkin into a computer."

"The Pumputer was conceived of to bring home the company's carving contest award for the Information Technology department. A 1990 Macintosh Classic computer was obtained and carefully dismantled. After insertion into a large pumpkin, it's peripherals were color coded to adhere to the Pumputer 1.0 model standards, and connected via VineBus, a very advanced serial connection."


"AmLaw Tech Survey: Law Firms Play Variations on Old Themes"

This interesting survey (the 11th annual), finds law firms expanding their information technology investments:

"True technological revolutions are few and far between. And making the 'old' work with the 'new' can make it increasingly difficult for chief information officers to maintain or advance the value of technology for their firms' lawyers. Results of the 11th Annual AmLaw Tech Survey [link in article] indicate that the Am Law 200 continue to build out their IT infrastructures -- as capital spending continues to climb steadily and technology staffs grow larger.

"As much as legal technology changes, it really does stay the same. While software applications with expanded features continue to hit the market, there aren't many entirely new types of programs that law firms are adopting right now. Instead, they're managing what amounts to variations on what have already become old themes.

"For instance, Chicago-based McDermott Will & Emery is in the process of upgrading its e-mail program. E-mail has been an integral part of most people's professional life for years, so it's anything but a 'killer new app.' Yet it's because legal software vendors have focused on developing programs to integrate with e-mail systems based on Microsoft Outlook Exchange, that users of Lotus Notes-based e-mail, like McDermott Will, have often found themselves left behind. That's why the firm finds itself wrestling with an e-mail problem in 2006."


Techie paralegal? Six Steps to a Global Network for Law Firms

Put on your tech hat & learn the practical steps for networking computers:

"While most of corporate America quickly embraced technology as a way to improve their business, law firms came a bit later to the party. Computers now may be ubiquitous at all major law firms, but many still struggle with larger technology issues, particularly when it comes to networking multiple offices.

[snip]

"While the initial investment to build a seamless network is substantial, once it is developed, maintenance and support staff to keep operations running smoothly generally cost far less than those with poorly integrated systems. In fact, studies show that the average law firm dedicates 6 to 7 percent of their gross revenue to technology spending -- at White & Case we average just 2.9 percent. The bottom line is that a seamless integrated technology solution is not only crucial to the long-term success of a large law firm but in many ways it is the lifeblood of the firm itself -- circulating the crucial information that our lawyers need to help clients succeed."

Karen Asner is a commercial litigator and an administrative partner at White & Case in New York, where she oversees all administrative aspects of the firm's 36 offices and helps shape firm culture, policies and strategic business objectives. Eugene Stein, White & Case's chief knowledge and technology officer, also contributed to the development of this article.